Accessibility at Sea

A topic close to my heart is accessibility and inclusion for everyone.  From a young age I have been surrounded by children and young adults who have various special educational needs and disabilities.  For several years my family and I have been apart of our local shared care network, providing rest breaks for parents and their children with disabilities, whilst also running an inclusive pre-school which specialises in SEND.  Suffice to say promoting inclusive practices is a big part of our lives and this is no different than when we are at sea!

IMG_1692

I truly believe that when done right, cruising provides a perfect opportunity to see the world.  I regularly cruise with my sister who has down’s syndrome and she absolutely loves it.  We also have many friends who have to use wheelchairs and choose to cruise because of the access they provide.  Cruise lines tend to go above and beyond to make sure you have the best holiday possible, but with all the choices and unknowns it can be a daunting prospect when trying to find the right cruise.

Sadly, it is true that even in this day and age cruise lines do still occasionally get it wrong.  We have experienced this and it can be very disheartening.  But if you find yourself in this position, let the cruise line know immediately.  If you’re still in the planning stages of your holiday then speak to your travel agent or the cruise line directly, and if you are already onboard speak to reception and get management involved  – they should do their upmost to help rectify any issues you are having and provide you with the best holiday possible.

If you are thinking about taking a cruise and have the added worry of organising an accessible holiday, British Cruising has just made their latest Info Hub live – Accessible Cruising.  It’s a great place to start and hopefully answers some of your immediate questions and lightens the path forward.  If you have any questions after reading this post, then let me know!

Keep smiling and happy sailing!

 

 

One thought on “Accessibility at Sea

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.